Women in Iran and the region

Women face a lot of inequalities in Iran. Compared to the Persian Gulf states women in Iran are still far better off. Even though the government imposes limitations on women, the Iranian society is much more open.

While in Saudi Arabia women are not even allowed to drive, this is not a problem at all in Iran. In fact there are even women racing drivers:

http://iranianroots.com/2013/11/29/laleh-seddigh-iranian-female-racing-driver/

http://iranianroots.com/2013/11/30/noora-naraghi-irans-female-motocross-champion/

The female literacy rate in Iran is higher than most other countries in the region despite the war with Iraq (1980-1988) and decades of sanctions.

Literacy rate, youth female (percent of females ages 15-24) Comparisons

Youth female literacy rate in Iran compared with other countries in the region

Women are highly educated. In fact they outperform men in university entrance exams,

https://theotheriran.com/2013/11/26/iran-females-outperform-males-in-university-entrance-exams/

and build the majority of Iran’s students. Women also take part in science competitions around the world and demonstrate their skills

https://theotheriran.com/2013/11/22/sepideh-mahabadi-the-second-girl-to-win-gold-in-the-history-of-the-international-computer-olympiad/

and even become international chess grand masters:

https://theotheriran.com/2013/11/24/atousa-pourkashiyan-iranian-chess-woman-grandmaster/

Besides that Sunni women are far better off in Shiite Iran than in radical Sunni Saudi Arabia:
https://theotheriran.com/2013/12/10/first-baluchi-sunni-woman-elected-mayor-in-iran/

Check more news about Iranian women here:

https://theotheriran.com/tag/women/

other news about Iranian originated women are available here:

http://iranianroots.com/tag/women/

Let us not forget that in some of Iran’s neighbor countries women are not even allowed to visit schools.

Still there is much more potential and a huge room for improvement regarding the situation of women in Iran.

Source of the data plotted above:

http://www.indexmundi.com/facts/indicators/SE.ADT.1524.LT.FE.ZS/compare?country=ir#country=af:1a:in:ir:ma:pk

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Blog recommendation: American woman backpacking in Iran

Read the blog and enjoy Silvia’s descriptions and pictures. Here are the links to the posts on Iran:

http://www.heartmybackpack.com/blog/backpacking-solo-through-iran/

http://www.heartmybackpack.com/blog/kafka-cigarettes-tehran/

http://www.heartmybackpack.com/blog/isfahan-iran/

If you are lazy just read some quotes here and go to the links to enjoy the pictures:

“I mean, Iran is home to one of the world’s oldest civilizations, hosts thirteen UNESCO World Heritage Sites, and boasts beautiful landscapes stretching from dense rain forests to snowcapped mountains to desert basins. Plus, so many travelers whom I met in Central Asia absolutely raved about Iran. The hospitable people, delicious food and historic sites – how could I not add Iran to my travel itinerary?”

“My first Couchsurfing hosts in Tehran, a young Ph.D. student and her roommate, said they were so excited to be hosting an American girl, and that they hope more tourists will start to come to Iran. They were incredibly warm and welcoming hosts, cooking delicious Persian food and asking me countless questions about Norway and the U.S. and foreigners’ impressions of Iran.”

“The thing is, I haven’t felt alone once since I landed in Iran. The receptionist at my first hotel took me in as her daughter, accompanying me to breakfast and lunch and suggesting sites for me to visit, my Couchsurfing hosts were like cool older sisters, chatting with me about religion and politics as well as the plot twists of Lost and J-Lo’s divorce (I’m so out of touch), and Rana truly has adopted me as her sister, with an invitation to lunch turning into a trip to visit Esfahan and then several days with her family in Tehran.”

“So far my experience in Iran has only been one of warmth and hospitality, and really, really amazing food! Though, in a few hours Rana and I are heading to Marivan, a small Kurdish city on the border to Iraq. So you know, maybe I’ll have some more eventful things to share from there! (Kidding, family, Kurdistan is of course totally safe.)”

“My stay in Tehran was far too short and left much of the city unexplored, but I did leave with an overwhelming crush on a city so full of life and passion. Shopkeepers greeted me with warmth (if also a degree of surprise), and the discussions I had with people there were always filled with genuine interest and reflection. ”

“While now a bustling modern city, Isfahan was once one of the largest cities in the world as it sat on a major intersection of the main north-south and east-west  routes crossing Iran. We seemed to stumble on reminders of Isfahan’s past glory around every corner, from impressive squares and tree-lined boulevards to covered bridges, palaces and mosques.”

“Moreover, while Isfahan might be dominated by Islamic architecture, the city is also home to important Christian, Jewish and Zoroastrian sites. Rana and I visited the Church of Saint Joseph of Arimathea, built by an Armenian community that settled in Isfahan in the early 1600s.”

Ok if you read so far, just make sure to visit the links above

Laleh Seddigh – Iranian female racing driver

Remarkable people with Iranian roots

A PhD student from Tehran, she has been nicknamed “a little Schumacher” after the German Formula One champion. She has been given the title of Iran’s best female racing driver. The story is featured in a BBC TV documentary called “Girl Racer”.

The documentary can be viewed here:

Image

She earned international fame by fending off a host of male competitors to become Iran’s national rally champion in 2005.

More infos:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laleh_Seddigh
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/14/international/middleeast/14seddigh.html?_r=2&pagewanted=all

The best posts on Iranian women:
http://theotheriran.com/tag/women/

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Photos: International Equestrian Tournament for teenage jockeys was held in Chitgar Park in Tehran, Iran

Thirty eight jockeys competed in the 1st International Equestrian Tournament for Juniors (jockeys aged between 14 and 18) organized by the Equestrian Federation of Iran.

The tournament took place from April 23 to April 24 in Chitgar Park, Tehran. Embassadors from Belgium, Belarus, Spain and Turkmenistan visited the event. The first place went to Sobhan Youssefi riding Fouravar, Arshia Tassafi riding Butterfly took the second place and Amir Azsalan Tambakoukar riding Jalisco the third.

The restults on Thursday were:
1st place: Salar Golestanian riding Anora,
2nd place: Mehrdad Ameri riding Karbeh and
3rd place: Sobhan Yousefi riding Fouravar

Sources: International Equestrian Federation | Calendar , IRNA | Photos, Equestrian Federation of Iran | News

 

 

Iranian female researcher Soudabeh Davaran awarded a UNESCO Medal

UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova presented the UNESCO Medal “For the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnologies” to eight laureates during a ceremony organized at UNESCO Headquarters on 10 April 2015.

The laureates of this 4th edition are Mr. Valentin Bukhtoyarov, Mr. Vladimir Fortov, Mr. Mikhail Kovalchuk and Mr. Mikhail Selyanin (Russian Federation), Ms. Constance Chang-Hasnain (United States), Ms. Tebello Nyokong (South Africa), Mr. Shem Wandiga (Keny) and Ms. Soodabeh Davaran (Iran).

The Medal was established in 2010 at the initiative of the Thematic group on “Nanoscience and Nanotechnologies” of the International Commission on the Development of the Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) – one of the world’s largest knowledge bases on sustainable development, evolving under the aegis of UNESCO.

About Prof. Soudabeh Davaran
She got her Master of Science in Chemistry in 1990 and in 1996 her PhD in Polymer Chemistry from Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran, where she is a Professor of Medicinal Chemistry since 2010. Her books include Dyehouse in Textile Industry, Advanced Nanoparticles in Biomedical Sciences and Impacts of Biodegradable Polymers Towards Biomedical Applications. She was considered one of the TOP 100 SCIENTISTS of 2008 and 2012 by the International Biographical Center of Cambridge.

She is currently researching in following fields:
– Preparation of biodegradable polymeric micro and nanoparticles for drug delivery
– Synthesis of polymeric nano-particles for application in detection and treatment of human cancer
– Synthesis, characterization of functionalized magnetic nano-particles for drug delivery
– Synthesis and evaluation of biodegradable polymers for protein-peptide drug delivery
– Bio-material Scaffold Development for regenerative medicine and drug delivery
– Development of oral insulin delivery systems

Sources: UNESCO Media Services | Eight UNESCO Medals awarded to nanotechnology and nano-science specialists, Faculty of Pharmacy at Tabriz University | Soudabeh Davaran

Tabiat (Nature) pedestrian bridge in Tehran, Iran by Leila Araghian from Diba Tensile Architecture

Tabiat Pedestrian Bridge is located in the northern part of Tehran in a zone called Abbas Abad Lands; this is a 559Ha area which is mainly dedicated to cultural spaces such as libraries and museums, as well as public parks. ‘Tabiat’ means ‘Nature’ in Persian language.

The bridge crosses Modarres Highway and connects Abo Atash Park on the west to Taleghani Park on the east. The intention was to design a pedestrian route that was completely separate from the highway. The 270 meters long bridge is the largest pedestrian bridge built so far in Iran.Design of this bridge was the result of a two-phase competition which started in May 2008. The winning design was selected in August of the following year. It was inaugurated in October 2014.

The architect’s idea was to create multiple paths on each park that would lead people on to the bridge. On the east side there are multiple paths branching from both levels of the bridge and connecting to other paths within Taleghani Park. On the west where it connects to Abo Atash Park, the bridge becomes 55 meters wide forming a plaza; here it is not clear and not easy to recognize where the park ends and where the bridge starts.

This bridge is a space intended to be a place to linger rather than just one to pass through, and to act as an extension of the parks, so seating areas and green spaces are on all parts of the bridge. There are a coffee shop and a restaurant on both sides of the lower level. The second level is mainly designed for those who are crossing from a park to the other and the third level areas act as viewing platforms, providing a wide open space which can also be used for public performances.

All the levels are connected to each other by stairs and ramps, providing multiple paths throughout the bridge to get from each level to another.

Leila Araghian - Architect - Diba Tensile Architecture, Iran

Leila Araghian – Architect and Design Manager from Diba Tensile Architecture

Architects: Leila Araghian from Diba Tensile Architecture
Project: Tabiat Pedestrian Bridge
Location: Tehran, Iran
Architectural Team: Alireza Behzadi, Sahar Yasaei
Collaborators: Homa Soleimani, Mina Nikoukalam, Masoud Momeni, Adel Mohammadi, Nader Naghipour, Payam Golfeshan, Farhad Elahi
Structural Engineer: Maffeis Engineering spa
Design: September 2009-December 2010
Construction: September 2010-October 2014
Length: 270 meters
Area: 7680 m2
Weight: 2000 tons

Sources: DIBA | Projects | Tabiat Pedestrian Bridge, Mehr News Agency | Photos, www.archdaily.com, www10.aeccafe.com

Iranian actress Roshanak Gerami

Roshanak Gerami (born on September 23, 1983 in Tehran) is an actress, known for The Rule of Accident (2013), Melbourne (2014) and No Where No Body (2013).

Posts on other interesting Iranian women: http://theotheriran.com/tag/women/

Sources: IMDB | Roshanak-Gerami, whatsupiran | Roshanak-Gerami