Esfahan – Ali Qapu Palace Music Room

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Ālī Qāpū (Persian: عالی‌قاپو‎, from Ottoman Turkish Âli Qapı – “High Porte“) is a grand palace in Isfahan, Iran.

It is forty-eight meters high and there are seven floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor music room, deep circular niches are found in the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also acoustic.

The building, another wonderful Safavid edifice, was built by decree of Shah Abbas the Great in the early seventeenth century. It was here that the great monarch used to entertain noble visitors, and foreign ambassadors.

The chancellery was stationed on the first floor. On the sixth, the royal reception and banquets were held. The largest rooms are found on this floor. The stucco decoration of the banquet hall abounds in motif of various vessels and cups. The sixth floor was popularly called (the music room).

Here various ensembles performed music and sang songs. From the upper galleries, the Safavid ruler watched polo, maneuvers and the horse-racing opposite the square of Naqsh-i-Jahan.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%80l%C4%AB_Q%C4%81p%C5%AB

Tehran – Azadi (Freedom) Tower Series

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Facts

One of the most familiar landmarks of Tehran.
Included in the building is a cultural centre with a library, a museum and several art galleries.

The entrance of the tower is directly underneath the main vault and leads into the Azadi Museum on the basement floor.

The main display is occupied by a copy of the Cyrus Cylinder (the original is in the British Museum).

The monument acts as a grandiose gateway to the Iranian capital, and is surrounded by a large plaza (approx. 50,000 m²).

Built in 1971 in commemoration of the 2,500th anniversary of the Persian Empire, this “Gateway into Iran” was named the Shahyad Tower, meaning “Kings’ Memorial”, but was dubbed Azadi (Freedom) after 1979. It is 50 meters (164 ft) tall and completely clad in cut marble.

More info:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azadi_Tower